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Welcome to Green Gal's blog, where you'll find stories, recipes, gardening updates, and green tips related to nature, adventure, placemaking, and food systems. This blog is written by a young woman entrepreneur who is also a beginning farmer-gardener and seasoned sustainability educator who loves to grow, cook, ferment, and eat local and ecologically happy food.

Tuesday, February 15, 2011

Tuesday Thoughts

I just returned from the dining hall after eating a delicious omelet scramble. My large brown bear mug is filled with the rich, suprisingly well-made coffee the dining hall serves, and it's sitting here on my desk, wafting wonderful scents into the room. When I got back to my house, I checked on the laundry I'd put in the wash right before leaving for breakfast, and my timing was perfect: the laundry was finished washing just as I walked in. Don't you just love when things work out like that?

After I post this, I will return to my reading assignment that is supposed to be completed by noon today for my Native American studies lecture. We're reading Native Features: Indigenous Films from Around the World by Houston Wood. I have to read to chapter 9, and then I'll move on to Archaeology homework. This book on films is quite interesting, as it describes many of the central themes found in indigenous films, as well as analyzes the issues with stereotype found in films about indigenous people made by non-indigenous people. We've watched some of the movies in class, including Rabbit-Proof Fence and Smoke Signals. I've never taken a class that analyzes film, so it's been a different experience for me to do so in the context of Native American studies. The class isn't only about film, but learning to decode popular media and recognize the dominant discourse and challenge it is definitely a central part of the class. We're learning to see the portrayal of Native American peoples in a different way, to question the accepted notions we have of the "Indian," and to understand why the stereotypes, mascots and iconic depictions are detrimental to Native American people. If Santa Cruz had a Native American studies major, I'd almost definitely be working toward it. The closest major Santa Cruz offers is American Studies with a concentration in Native American studies. I'm leaning toward that over Anthropology at this point, but I don't have to declare any majors until the end of next quarter. I'm also still considering Literature as a possible major. Next quarter, I'm planning on taking another American Studies class (my Native American studies class is American Studies 80E), as well as a Literature class, so I can make a decision about what major I'd like to declare. I could always change it. There are just so many wonderful options to choose from!

But, I should probably get back to my schoolwork. I spent the weekend snow camping in Yosemite, and as a result, I am a little behind in my reading. I went with a group from the UCSC Recreation Department, and we camped about a mile from Badger Pass, on the way to Dewey Point. It was an excellent, challenging, chilly trip. Perhaps I'll post about it on a future blog post.

The weather here in Santa Cruz today is typical...it's the kind of weather students here love. Overcast, but not too chilly. I've got my turtleneck sweater on and my down jacket handy (I definitely learned how to stay warm on my snow camping trip, and I've already put that knowledge to use on campus). My coffee and my reading assignment are waiting for me...

How is your day going? Post in the comments!

Happy Tuesday!
Isn't life awesome?

- Green Gal

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Breathe in experience. Muriel Rukeyser

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